Archive for the 'Essays (agriculture etc.)' Category

Cloning America Part III Sunday, April 12th, 2009

Cloning America Part III

American cloning can also be found in the vital arena of big agriculture – a keystone industry that is often overseen by pigeonholed demographics. In his article, “Breadbasket of Democracy,” author Ted Nace describes the Red River Valley of North Dakota as “football-on-Friday-night country, where Clear Channel Radio sets the tone, and patriotic themes blend smoothly with corporate ones. Broad and pancake-flat, with topsoil measured in feet rather than inches, it possesses some of the most prized agricultural land in America” (Nace 53).

(more…)

Cloning America Part II Sunday, April 12th, 2009

Reproduced below is part II of an essay that sheds some light on current agricultural issues that no doubt affect the bees. Part III will appear later.

Cloning America: Or How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Rewrite History Part II

“Approved by the Nevada County Board of Supervisors in May 2000, NH 2020 was intended as a community-based, participatory effort to respond to the perceived risk of ‘losing the natural and scenic qualities that distinguish [Nevada County] from other more urbanized regions of the state and country. In a country dominated demographically and economically by exurban immigrants who came for just these qualities, NH 2020 might have been expected to raise little controversy” (Walker and Fortmann 470). (more…)

Cloning America Essay Part I Sunday, April 12th, 2009

Reproduced below is an essay that sheds some light on current agricultural issues that no doubt affect the bees. It will be split into parts and provided throughout the week.

Cloning America: Or How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Rewrite History

It has long been a warning amongst the scientific community that when anything is cloned, it loses something. To reproduce an identical copy of an already imperfect being guarantees an impurity — a mutation. This lesson is hardly limited to technological advancement and procedure. It applies to the far more abstract realm of history, culture and geographical identity quite nicely. After all, each one mentioned is a dynamic, living phenomenon. (more…)